As soon as (conjunction)

We use as soon as to show that something happens immediately, i.e. ‘at the very moment another action is completed’, or ‘shortly after another action is completed’.

  • I’ll call you as soon as I arrive.
    [= ‘I will arrive and then I’ll call you immediately.’]
  • As soon as I have the information, I’ll tell you.
    [= ‘I’ll get the information and then I’ll tell you immediately.’]

As soon as I will . . .

We do not use will with as soon as when speaking about the future:

  • I’m going to have a shower as soon as I will get home. 
  • He will be back tomorrow; I’ll give him the message as soon as I will see him. 

Position of as soon as in a sentence

As soon as comes at the beginning of a subordinate clause. We can begin our sentence with either the subordinate clause or the main clause – the meaning is the same. Look at this example:

  • As soon as we got out the car, it started raining.
    [subordinate clause]                  [main clause]
  • It started raining as soon as we got out the car.
    [main clause]         [subordinate clause]

Which tenses do we use with as soon as?

Tenses used with as soon as
We use the present simple with as soon as when we speak about repeated actions.

As soon as he wakes up, he checks his phone for messages.
We use the present simple with as soon as when we speak about the future. We do not use will.

I'll go to the shops as soon as it stops raining.
as soon as it will stop
We can also use the present perfect with as soon as when we speak about the future. The meaning is the same.

I'll go to the shops as soon as it has stopped / as soon as it stops raining.
We use the past simple with as soon as when we speak about the past.

We can also use the past perfect. The meaning is the same.

They restarted the tennis match as soon as the rain stopped.
They restarted the tennis match as soon as the rain had stopped.