Upper-intermediate grammar exercise: future perfect simple vs. continuous

English grammar practice exercise, upper-intermediate / advanced level.

This exercise focuses on the difference between the future perfect simple and the future perfect continuous.

Instructions: Complete the sentences below by putting the verb in brackets into the future perfect simple or future perfect continuous.



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Structure of future perfect (simple)
positive negative question
The film will have started by the time we get there. The film will not (won't) have started by the time we get there. Will the film have started by the time we get there?

Structure of future perfect continuous
positive negative question
Next year I'll (I will) have been working in the company for 10 years. I won't (will not) have been working in the company for 10 years. Will you have been working in the company for 10 years?



Future perfect simple - common mistakes
Common mistakes Correct version Why?
The film will already has started by the time we get home. The film will already have started by the time we get home. The form of the future perfect is will + have + past participle.
Will have you finished it by the time I come back? Will you have finished it by the time I come back? The structure for questions is will + subject + have + past participle.

Future perfect continuous - common mistakes
Common mistakes Correct version Why?
I will have working in the company for five years next month. I will have been working in the company for five years next month. The form of the future perfect continuous is will + have + been + past participle.
I will haven't been working in the company for five years next month. I will not (won't) have been working in the company for five years next month. The form of the negative is will not + have + been + past participle.
Will have you been working in the company for five years next month? Will you have been working in the company for five years next month? The form of the question is will + subject + have + been + past participle.
I'll have been working in three different positions at the company by the end of the year. I'll have worked in three different positions at the company by the end of the year. We use the simple form when we give the number of completed actions.


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