Intermediate grammar exercise: future simple (will) or ‘going to’ future

English grammar practice exercise, for pre-intermediate and intermediate level.

In this exercise you will practise the future simple (will) versus the ‘going to’ future.

Instructions: Use the words in brackets to put the following into the correct tense – the future simple (will) or ‘going to’ future.

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Structure of future simple
statement negative question
I will (I'll) be there tomorrow.
You will (you'll) be there.
He/she/it will (he'll) be there.
We will (we'll) be there.
They will (they'll) be there.
I won't (will not) be there.
You won't be there.
He/she/it won't be there.
We won't be there.
They won't be there.
Will I be there tomorrow?
Will you be there?
Will he/she/it be there?
Will we be there?
Will they be there?


Structure of 'going to' future
positive negative  question
I'm (I am) going to take my holidays in August. I'm (I am) not going to take a holiday this year.     Are you going to take a holiday?
He's (he is) going to watch TV this evening. He isn't (is not) going to watch TV this evening. Is he going to watch TV this evening?



Future simple - common mistakes
Common mistakes Correct version Why?
- The phone's ringing.
- OK, I'm going to answer it.
Ok - I'll answer it. If the action is decided at the moment of speaking, we use 'will' / 'will not'.
I'm sure he is going to help you. I'm sure he will help you. When we say what we think or expect, we use 'will'.
I won't probably be there. I probably won't be there.
I'll probably be there.
The adverbs 'definitely' and 'probably' comes before 'won't' but after 'will'.
I promise I'm going to help. I promise I'll help. After 'promise' we usually use 'will', not the 'going to' future.
I'll call you when I'll come to my office. I'll call you when I come to my office. When we refer to the future in adverbial clauses, we normally use the present simple (after 'when', 'as soon as' and 'until').
If you will give me your address, I'll send you a postcard. If you give me your address, I'll send you a postcard. When we refer to the future in conditional clauses, we normally use the present simple.
I can't see you next week. I will return to Paris. I can't see you next week. I am returning/am going to return to Paris. To show that the decision was made in the past, we use the present continuous or the 'going to' future.

'going to' for future - common mistakes
Common mistakes Correct version Why?
You know that I'll buy a new car, don't you? You know that I am going to buy a new car, don't you? We use going to for a future action that has been decided before the time of speaking.
Look! You will drop your books. Look! You are going to drop your books. We use going to if we see (and are sure) that the action will happen.