Business vocabulary exercise: correspondence verbs (attach, reply, forward, enclose) ex. 2

Business English vocabulary exercise, intermediate level.

This exercise gives you practice using four verbs often used in correspondence:

attach | reply | forward | enclose

You can see exercise 1 here.

Exercise instructions

1. Study the vocabulary, including ‘how to use’ and the example sentences.
2. Do the exercise below and check your answers.

attach

a.ttach

attach
verb to join one thing to another; to add a file to an email
how to use attach something, attach something to something
countable noun: an attachment
adjective: attached
examples 1. I’ve attached a copy of the contract.
2. A copy of the invoice is attached.
3. Please attach a recent photograph to your application form.

enclose

en.close

enclose
verb to put something inside an envelope with a letter
how to use enclose something, a price list, a copy of another letter
countable noun: an enclosure
examples 1. I am enclosing our latest price list.
2. Our price list is enclosed.

reply

re.ply

reply
verb to write back to someone who has written to you
how to use reply to a letter/invitation/advertisement
countable noun: a reply
examples 1. They haven’t replied to our invitation so I assume they are not coming.
2. I wrote to him three weeks ago, but he hasn’t replied yet.
3.Thank you for your quick reply.

forward

for.ward

forward
verb to pass on a letter or message to someone else
how to use forward something, a letter/an email/ a message to someone
forward someone something, a letter/an email/ a message
examples 1. Don’t worry: we will forward all your letters to your new address.
2. I am forwarding you a copy of his email.

Now complete the following using attach, reply, forward or enclose in its correct form:

questions go herescore goes here

Was this exercise helpful?

Learn more – our 18-page e-book ‘Business Correspondence Language’ has all the language you need to write professional business emails, including:

  • How to use “therefore”
  • How to use “as”
  • How to use “however”
  • How to use “nonetheless”
  • Example sentences of opening and closing lines in business emails
  • A list of common ’email’ words + examples

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