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Much, many exercise: uncountable vs. countable nouns

Much, many exercise: uncountable vs. countable nouns

Uncountable vs. countable ‘Business English’ nouns: exercise This exercise tests your ability to recognise nouns as either countable or uncountable by using much or many with the... »

Upper-intermediate grammar exercise: have something done

Upper-intermediate grammar exercise: have something done

Have something done: exercise English grammar practice exercise, upper-intermediate level.  This exercise gives you practice using the structure have something done. Exercise instructions: L... »

Upper-intermediate grammar exercise: supposed to

Upper-intermediate grammar exercise: supposed to

Supposed to: exercise English grammar practice exercise, upper-intermediate level.  This exercise gives you practice using supposed to. Instructions: – Use supposed to + the verb given in br... »

Levels

Beginner exercises | Intermediate exercises| Upper-inter exercises

Latest posts

Prohibit and forbid: what’s the difference?

Prohibit and forbid: what’s the difference?

Prohibit and forbid: the same meaning, but . . . Prohibit and forbid have the same meaning, but we use them differently. Examples Children are forbidden to chew gum at school. The dissident was forbid... »

Forget something, leave something

Forget something, leave something

Forget or leave something? We use forget to say we accidentally left something behind. We usually say leave if we mention the place. Oh no! I’ve forgotten my book. Oh no! I’ve left my book... »

Idiom: to take something with a pinch of salt

Idiom: to take something with a pinch of salt

take something with a pinch of salt to not automatically believe something, not immediately assume that someone is telling the truth You should take what she says with a pinch of salt – she’s always e... »

How to tell if a word is countable or uncountable

How to tell if a word is countable or uncountable

This is one of my students. And he has a typical grammar problem: “Help – I don’t know if this word is countable or uncountable!” Actually, it’s not just one of my students – m... »

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A2 level: Grammar / Conditional sentences (6 lessons)

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A2 level: Grammar / Prepositions of place (3 lessons)

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Most popular courses

A2 level: Grammar / Conditional sentences (6 lessons)

B1 level: Listening / News reports (4 lessons)

B2 level: Vocabulary / Food idioms (7 lessons)

A2 level: Grammar / Prepositions of place (3 lessons)

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